Me. And I'm more than capable of displaying rather extreme amounts of eccentricity.


nythroughthelens:

Street art. Soho, New York City
Through each and every scattered urban landscape every sidewalk dream unfolds periphally as daily adventurers traverse the city full of promise and silent giddy trepidation.
It’s in the quiet still moments marked by emptiness, vast loneliness and encroaching solitude that these peripheral dreamscapes come into focus.
These moments, suspended in time, marinate in the severity of their potential to eventually etch themselves into the eternity of the mind.
The rest of time moves with the rapid ebb and flow of life like bits and pieces of paint on a wall chipping and peeling off, finally scattering like a discarded lover’s flower petals in the wind.
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Buy “Watching You” Prints and Posters here, View my store, email me, or ask for help.

nythroughthelens:

Street art. Soho, New York City

Through each and every scattered urban landscape every sidewalk dream unfolds periphally as daily adventurers traverse the city full of promise and silent giddy trepidation.

It’s in the quiet still moments marked by emptiness, vast loneliness and encroaching solitude that these peripheral dreamscapes come into focus.

These moments, suspended in time, marinate in the severity of their potential to eventually etch themselves into the eternity of the mind.

The rest of time moves with the rapid ebb and flow of life like bits and pieces of paint on a wall chipping and peeling off, finally scattering like a discarded lover’s flower petals in the wind.

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Buy “Watching You” Prints and Posters here, View my store, email me, or ask for help.



nythroughthelens:

The Andy Monument, a tribute to Andy Warhol. Union Square, New York City.
This is a public art installation tribute monument of Andy Warhol by artist Rob Pruitt. It went up at the end of March and will be on view in Union Square until October. It is situated on this particular corner since this is where Andy Warhol would stand when he signed and gave away copies of Interview magazine. It is also just steps away from the Factory:
“In 1968, Andy moved the Factory to the sixth floor of the Decker Building, 33 Union Square West, near Max’s Kansas City, a club Warhol and his entourage would frequently visit.
By the time Warhol had become famous, he was working day and night on his paintings. To create his art, Warhol used silkscreens so that he could mass-produce images the way capitalist corporations mass produce consumer goods. In order to continue working the way he did, he assembled a menagerie of adult film performers, drag queens, socialites, drug addicts, musicians, and free-thinkers that became known as the Warhol Superstars, to help him. These “art-workers” helped him create his paintings, starred in his films, and basically developed the atmosphere for which the Factory became legendary.
Aside from his two-dimensional art, Andy also used the Factory as a base to make shoes, films, commissions, sculptures and just about everything else that the Warhol name could be attached to and sold. His first commissions consisted of a single silkscreen portrait for $25,000, with additional canvases in other colors for $5,000 each. He later made that $20,000. Warhol used a large portion of his income to finance the lifestyle of his Factory friends, practically showering them with resources. - Source
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Buy “The Andy Warhol Monument” Posters and Prints here, email me, or ask for help.

nythroughthelens:

The Andy Monument, a tribute to Andy Warhol. Union Square, New York City.

This is a public art installation tribute monument of Andy Warhol by artist Rob Pruitt. It went up at the end of March and will be on view in Union Square until October. It is situated on this particular corner since this is where Andy Warhol would stand when he signed and gave away copies of Interview magazine. It is also just steps away from the Factory:

“In 1968, Andy moved the Factory to the sixth floor of the Decker Building, 33 Union Square West, near Max’s Kansas City, a club Warhol and his entourage would frequently visit.

By the time Warhol had become famous, he was working day and night on his paintings. To create his art, Warhol used silkscreens so that he could mass-produce images the way capitalist corporations mass produce consumer goods. In order to continue working the way he did, he assembled a menagerie of adult film performers, drag queens, socialites, drug addicts, musicians, and free-thinkers that became known as the Warhol Superstars, to help him. These “art-workers” helped him create his paintings, starred in his films, and basically developed the atmosphere for which the Factory became legendary.

Aside from his two-dimensional art, Andy also used the Factory as a base to make shoes, films, commissions, sculptures and just about everything else that the Warhol name could be attached to and sold. His first commissions consisted of a single silkscreen portrait for $25,000, with additional canvases in other colors for $5,000 each. He later made that $20,000. Warhol used a large portion of his income to finance the lifestyle of his Factory friends, practically showering them with resources. - Source

Buy “The Andy Warhol Monument” Posters and Prints here, email me, or ask for help.