Me. And I'm more than capable of displaying rather extreme amounts of eccentricity.


nythroughthelens:

Bow bridge in the winter covered in snow. Central Park, New York City
It’s another super hot day in New York City today. The temperature is currently something like 101 degrees (fahrenheit) with heat index values climbing up to around 115 in certain places. I have decided that the only way to cope is to look at photos of New York City in the dead of winter like this one.
This particular image was taken back in January during a blizzard. New York City got something like 19 inches of snow and this was only weeks after the first blizzard of the season which practically shut the city down.
Central Park in the midst of heavy snowfall is absolutely magical. Because of the heavy wind gusts and storm conditions, the only people in the park were either very adventurous tourists trying to make the best of their vacation to New York City and other crazy photographers reveling in the beauty of Central Park’s landscapes covered in ice and snow. I spent around 4 hours there in total and only came across less than 10 people in total. The people I did come across were very friendly and in awe of the environment.
This is one of Central Park’s most popular bridges, Bow Bridge. It’s one of my favorite spots in the park. It’s usually packed with people enjoying the views from on the bridge itself.  Under Bow Bridge sits The Lake which spans 22 acres and is Central Park’s largest body of water. It is fully iced over and covered in snow.
“Bow Bridge, shaped like an archer’s bow, was built between 1859 and 1862. It connects the Ramble and Cherry Hill, and spans more than 60 feet of the Lake. Because the south bank was higher than the north, construction of the cast iron bridge included raising the height of its northern abutment. Janes, Kirkland, and Co., the firm responsible for the dome of The Capitol in Washington, D.C., did the ironwork for the span of Bow Bridge. Vaux and Mould created the ornamental iron railing that incorporates elements of Gothic, Neo-Classical, and Renaissance design.” Source
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In other news, a photo of mine from the most recent Manahttanhenge was used as the first photo for this photo-spread on My Modern Met here: The Manhattanhenge Phenomenon
Additionally, I won some swag from Gansevoort Hotel due to being one of two winners of a contest they ran called Gansevoorthenge where they asked for Manhattanhenge photo submissions via Twitter. You can see an embarrassing photo of me taken a few days ago in the midst of this heatwave (I hate all photos of myself!) with the winning swag here: Our #Gansevoorthenge Photo Contest Winners!
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Buy “Roof Top Graffiti in Chinatown” Posters and Prints here, View my store, email me, or ask for help.

nythroughthelens:

Bow bridge in the winter covered in snow. Central Park, New York City

It’s another super hot day in New York City today. The temperature is currently something like 101 degrees (fahrenheit) with heat index values climbing up to around 115 in certain places. I have decided that the only way to cope is to look at photos of New York City in the dead of winter like this one.

This particular image was taken back in January during a blizzard. New York City got something like 19 inches of snow and this was only weeks after the first blizzard of the season which practically shut the city down.

Central Park in the midst of heavy snowfall is absolutely magical. Because of the heavy wind gusts and storm conditions, the only people in the park were either very adventurous tourists trying to make the best of their vacation to New York City and other crazy photographers reveling in the beauty of Central Park’s landscapes covered in ice and snow. I spent around 4 hours there in total and only came across less than 10 people in total. The people I did come across were very friendly and in awe of the environment.

This is one of Central Park’s most popular bridges, Bow Bridge. It’s one of my favorite spots in the park. It’s usually packed with people enjoying the views from on the bridge itself. Under Bow Bridge sits The Lake which spans 22 acres and is Central Park’s largest body of water. It is fully iced over and covered in snow.

“Bow Bridge, shaped like an archer’s bow, was built between 1859 and 1862. It connects the Ramble and Cherry Hill, and spans more than 60 feet of the Lake. Because the south bank was higher than the north, construction of the cast iron bridge included raising the height of its northern abutment. Janes, Kirkland, and Co., the firm responsible for the dome of The Capitol in Washington, D.C., did the ironwork for the span of Bow Bridge. Vaux and Mould created the ornamental iron railing that incorporates elements of Gothic, Neo-Classical, and Renaissance design.” Source

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In other news, a photo of mine from the most recent Manahttanhenge was used as the first photo for this photo-spread on My Modern Met here: The Manhattanhenge Phenomenon

Additionally, I won some swag from Gansevoort Hotel due to being one of two winners of a contest they ran called Gansevoorthenge where they asked for Manhattanhenge photo submissions via Twitter. You can see an embarrassing photo of me taken a few days ago in the midst of this heatwave (I hate all photos of myself!) with the winning swag here: Our #Gansevoorthenge Photo Contest Winners!

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Buy “Roof Top Graffiti in Chinatown” Posters and Prints here, View my store, email me, or ask for help.